50 Ways to Get More Birdies and Improve Your Disc Golf Game


Birdies in disc golf are the pinnacle of each hole. I know that we all can get eagles, double eagles, and even the occasional ace. But those are hardly achievable on every hole. The birdie, or 1 under par, is what we strive to achieve each time we step up onto the teepad. Each time you look to improve your disc golf game, you can only hope to come up with a better score.

The ace is rare. The eagle comes few and far between. But the birdie helps you separate yourself from the pack (like Paul Mcbeth at the 2019 Waco Charity Open). If you can consistently score 1 under par on every hole, you have a really good chance of winning all your rounds.

We all want birdies…

…That’s a fact. So we’re not going to waste any more time. This list of 50 tips was researched and put together so that you can learn not just how to improve your game, but how to help you get more of those precious birdies while you’re out there playing. The first few tips will focus on you as you’re going through your round. The remaining tips are for general improvement.

What are the 50 ways to get more birdies?


1. Stretch before you play

2. 10X your putting

3. Get comfortable outside the putting circle

4. Obstacle putting practice

5. Confidence on the course

6. Positive mindset

7. Learn how to scramble after a bad shot

8. Intense concentration and focus on every shot

9. Throw with the right discs

10. Throw discs that feel good to you

11. Don’t overcomplicate with 15+ discs

12. Approach matters

13. Understand your distance and that it’s not always about distance

14. Balanced throws – distance and accuracy

15. Disc down for control

16. Focus on a spot

17. Slow everything down

18. Leave yourself options for your next shot

19. Always be aware of OB, water, and other birdie-killing obstacles

20. Don’t think about the trees

21. Tree-jected? Who cares?

22. Competition is good

23. Shoot for eagles

24. Watch the weather

25. Watch the ground conditions

26. Use a birdie bag and a towel to keep hands/discs dry

27. Use friction disc golf gloves in wet weather

28. Hydrate a lot

29. Don’t always focus on birdies – just try to do well.

30. Don’t sacrifice your par

31. Practice how you play

32. You have to buy training equipment

33. Your technique needs to be flawless

34. Expertly learn forehand/backhand/tomahawk

35. Analyze yourself

36. Record yourself…then ask the #discgolfcommunity

37. Watch the pros at a real tournament – watch how they play and get birdies

38. Watch the pros on YouTube

39. New courses

40. Practice in bad weather

41. Go get a good pair of shoes

42. Don’t give up on the game – go unconventional

43. Message a pro

44. Learn from a mentor

45. Don’t reject criticism

46. It’s okay to be a little dumb – make sure you ask questions

47. Popular disc golf books

48. 101 tips list

49. Have fun

50. Remember: your score and improvement are what matter

While you’re playing – let’s get some more birdies

1. Stretch before you play

I know the last thing you want to hear is this tip. But this is the absolute best way to start a round. Stretching your body gives your muscles and tendons a chance to stretch out and get partially warmed up, which let’s your body become loose quicker. This will lead to less chance of injury, better throws earlier in your round, and more birdies overall.

Check out our stretching guide, “The 17 Best Disc Golf Stretches to Improve Your Game.”

2. 10X your putting

What do I mean when I say 10X your putting? I mean I want you to improve your putting times ten. I want you to get ten times better at putting because putting is one of the most important aspects of your disc golf game.

“Drive for show, putt for dough.”

Have you ever heard of that phrase? If you havent that’s okay. It means that your drive is to show off, but your putting is what helps you win the money. I want you to 10X your putting because putting is what helps you win. Part of this section is for while you’re on the course, part of it is for practice later. No matter where you are, though, I want you to emphasize putting whenever possible. As boring as always practicing your putting may sound, in the end you will be grateful you did. Because you’ll make the important putts.

While you’re on the course, make sure to always focus on the putts. Once you get close, take your time and try to crush every putt you attempt. Try out some of the putting drills from our drills post, and during rounds, take multiple extra putt attempts to continue with extra putting practice. Before or after rounds, go to the course practice basket, or any basket, and practice 50 to 500 more putts.

NBA great Kobe Bryant was known to practice hundreds of free throws before basketball practice. NBA great Michael Jordan did the same after practice. Because of relentless practice, they got better and better. When you want to 10X your putting, you have to be willing to work 10 times as hard.

Outside of normal rounds, you can buy a practice basket (link to InfiniteDiscs.com), try out different disc golf putting drills, go to putting clinics, and just continue to practice your putting over and over and over again until you can absolutely crush it during play.

What else can you do to help yourself with putting? Check out our post, “The 12 Best Disc Golf Putting Tips for Beginners.”

3. Get comfortable outside the putting circle

Continuing with this theme in putting, another way to get better at putting is to get more comfortable outside of the putting circle. The circle I’m talking about, also called the, “10-meter circle,” is a literal circle 10 meters out and all the way around the basket. Just fyi, 10 meters is 32 feet 9.7 inches. Sometimes, courses will be marked. And most tournaments have a circle around the basket.

Here’s a simple drill you can try: once you make your approach and get within 10 meters, take out another disc and go back a foot or two past 32 feet. Same shot just further back. Attempt to make that shot. Now do this for every hole. Every time you get a disc within the circle, go back outside the circle and try to make the shot. This will help you get a little bit more comfortable with shots outside the circle.

For a great disc to try with this drill, check out the Innova Birdie putt and approach. You can find it here on InfiniteDiscs.com.

4. Obstacle putting practice

Kind of along the same lines as the drill from the last section, obstacle putting practice sees you taking your discs behind an obstacle or placing an obstacle in between you and the basket. Once you do this, practice putting around the obstacle. This is a simple way to help yourself get familiar with trying to make these tough shots. And when you have them during a round, you’ll be familiar with them. They should be a piece of cake by then. You can practice this on your own or during your rounds.

5. Confidence on the course

This next tip for you applies for putting as well as other parts of the game. I’m talking about your ability to be confident with yourself on the course. Obviously you want to be confident with your putting, but you have to be confident in every other part of the game as well. Simply telling yourself that you will make that tough putt or crush that precarious tunnel shot is a great start.

Confidence is very hard to develop at first, but as you get better and better, it will inevitably come to you. Just keep practicing and thinking about being confident. You will get there and confidence will happen. The more confident you are, the better you will play (and the more birdies you will get). C’mon…you got this!

Check out Livestrong.com’s post here on how to build self-confidence in sports. It’s a pretty good read.

6. Positive mindset

Similarly to the last tip is the positive mindset concept. With this, it just requires that you be generally positive with what you do on the course. You don’t have to be a happy, bubbly person, but you can’t be negative all the time and you can’t face every bad situation like it’s the end of the world. Some bad things will happen on the course but just being a little bit more positive can completely change your situation while you play. Being a little bit more positive while playing usually leads to better rounds and way more birdies.

Verywellfit.com has a good read on the importance of positivity for athletes. You can check it out here.

7. Learn how to scramble after a bad shot

This tip here is a great segue from the last one. Positivity is helpful, especially when your last shot was absolutely terrible. And it sucks when your disc doesn’t do what you wanted it to do. But it happens.

When your throw goes awry, you need to know how to improvise and scramble to come back from the bad. If you can do this, you will do absolutely fine during play. If your throws are good, you’re in good shape. If they’re bad, you’ll be in just as good of shape because you know how to handle bad shots.

To practice recovering from bad shots, try worst shot disc golf: I love and I hate worst shot disc golf. If you’ve ever played doubles by yourself, and you go with the best shot out of the two throws, this is the opposite. Worst shot disc golf requires that you throw two discs and play the worst shot out of the two. On that shot, you throw two again and play the worse of the two. You keep this up until you sink the putt.

Two great all-purpose discs to use during your worst shot rounds are the Innova Atlas and the Innova Wombat. You can find them both on InfiniteDiscs.com.

8. Intense concentration and focus on every shot

Imagine this: you’re on hole 18 playing to be this year’s disc golf world champion. It’s hot and you’re sweating bullets. Ricky Wysocki is right behind you and will beat you if you make one mistake. If you can crush this last drive, approach, and sink the putt in 3 shots, you win. The amount of concentration and focus you would put into those 3 shots would be more intense than any other disc golf experience you’ve had up to this point. Now let’s snap back to reality.

Most likely, you won’t be in that situation anytime soon. But the point of that little scenario is to try and think about the intense concentration and focus it would take to win. And I want you to try and channel all of that every single time you play. Your level of focus and concentration will determine your score and the amount of birdies you will get.

Check out our post, “The 7 Best Mental Disc Golf Tips to Crush it on the Course,” to help you out a little bit with your focus and concentration.

Robert McCall of Dynamic Discs also wrote a good little piece on mental focus that you can read here.

9. Throw with the right discs

No matter what level of player you are, you need to be throwing with the right discs for the skill level you’re at. If you’re relatively new, you need beginner discs. Intermediate players can play with beginner and intermediate discs. And advanced players can play with any level of disc. If you’re unsure about your skill level, just stick with beginner discs and work your way up.

If you want to put in more effort than that to guarantee that you’re throwing with the right discs, learn about disc golf flight ratings by checking out our flight ratings guide here.

We’ve also got a great post highlighting the 37 best discs for beginners. You can take a look at that here.

If you’re intermediate to advanced, you probably already know which flight ratings go with which discs. If that’s the case, check out InfiniteDiscs.com to grab you some new ones. If you’re making sure to throw with the right discs, you’re score will definitely keep improving.

10. Throw discs that feel good to you

This tip runs along the same lines as the last one but is fairly simple. Find discs that are for your skill level and make sure that you actually like to throw them. If you try out a disc and absolutely hate it, try something else.

My buddy Hunter gave me a Dynamic Discs Sheriff and I love to throw it. So much that I bought a second one (links to InfiniteDiscs.com). I found a Champion Boss on my local course, tried it, and I hate throwing it. It’s a great disc and always throws well, but I’m just not fond of how it feels. So it usually stays in my bag. The point is to find something that you like and throw it. When you like how a disc feels, you’ll throw it better and help yourself get more birdies.

11. Don’t overcomplicate with 15+ discs

This tip is an easy one. When you’re a newer player, keep your bag simple. As cool as discs are, you don’t need to keep 37 discs in your bag to throw. Get good with 10-12 discs (or less). I’ve got about 5-7 discs that I consistently throw in every round. You’ll get better and improve your score quicker.

12. Approach matters

Understanding how to successfully approach a basket can be one of the most important parts of the game of disc golf. Knowing how to park a disc right by the basket is key to getting more birdies and winning your rounds. You don’t always need to be the hero. Just getting the disc up right next to the basket will do the trick.

To practice your approach shots, try this: Mark off where the 10 meter circle is before you practice this (if it isn’t marked already). Start out at about 50 meters, or just over 160 feet out (estimate this…it doesn’t have to be perfect). Get 7-10 discs and practice throwing them into the 10 meter circle around the basket. Your intention is to get as close to the basket as possible, but into the circle. Try a couple rounds of this but keep throwing until you can easily get all of your discs into that 10 meter circle and feel good about your approach shots.

If you’re looking for a good approach disc, try out the Westside Discs Harp (link to InfiniteDiscs.com). It’s great for that quick practice drill.

13. Understand your distance and that it’s not always about distance

Okay, so 2 quick parts to this one:

1. Know your own distance – figure out the maximum distance that you can throw. Knowing that can help you strategize and plan for your next shot. You can easily find out your distance by throwing on a marked football field. These fields are 360 feet long so it’s just about perfect. Throw your disc, find how many yards it went, then times that by 3. A 100 yard throw just went 300 feet.

2. It’s not always about distance – just remember that control, accuracy, and a good score are almost more important than being able to throw 400 feet. If you can birdie every hole, distance really doesn’t even matter.

14. Balanced throws – distance and accuracy

Similar to the last tip, you need to recognize that there’s more to the game than just trying to throw the disc as far as possible. Control and accuracy play a major factor in you achieving a good score with a lot of birdies.

The net drill: this drill, involving a net and a hula hoop, can help you improve your accuracy by forcing you to throw the disc straight and through the hula hoop. You can find this drill here as part of our 50 best drills post.

15. Disc down for control

If you’re having issues with your accuracy and control, try discing down and practicing on the course. I tell new players in most of my tip lists that they need to, “Disc. The. F*ck. Down,” in order to get better control of discs and improve their accuracy. Try playing full rounds with mid-range discs or even putters. Sometimes I take my Dynamic Discs Judge and my Westside Discs Harp out to play a full 18 holes. It’s tough because they don’t fly far, but they help me focus on control and accuracy.

16. Focus on a spot

To help yourself more with accuracy and control, try focusing on a spot in the distance. Find an easy object to throw at, like a tree or a basket (duh). Throwing towards something will help you focus on getting the disc going in that direction.

17. Slow everything down

This is a simple tip helped me out tremendously. I’m not a guy that likes to waste time, so I usually try to speed through my rounds. But I always slow my shots down. Whether I’m driving, approaching, or putting, I take just a little bit of extra time to go through and take a smooth, controlled shot toward the basket. Once I started doing this, my score improved dramatically.

18. Leave yourself options for your next shot

Let’s say that you’re on a hole with a dogleg right. The fairway goes straight and then turns right to finish at the basket. Where you park your initial drive could cause you to lose your birdie on the hole. If you place your disc too close to the woods on the right, it might be tough to get your disc around the trees and towards the basket. But if you throw the disc to the middle of the fairway, that might open up more option for you. Options that help you get your birdie. That’s what you have to do: leave yourself good options for your next shot.

19. Always be aware of OB, water, and other birdie-killing obstacles

Awareness is your friend on the disc golf course. In order to not lose strokes on every hole, you need to be aware of things that will crush your score like Out of Bounds, water, and any other obstacles that will get in your way. Out of bounds during competitive play can be especially precarious because of how it can be marked. A weirdly placed out of bounds can just crush what would normally be a good shot. But sometimes it happens.

Also, tiny branches can be a nasty little surprise that would have otherwise been a great hyzer to the basket. If your disc goes out of bounds, check out our post, “What if My Disc Golf Disc Goes Out of Bounds?”

But what about trees? Don’t worry, we got you.

20. Don’t think about the trees

Trees suck. Try this when you play: forget about the trees. I know it may be hard when all you see are those luscious lumps of lumber littered all over the landscape (try saying that 5X fast). But trees will always be there. And you will hit them. So just forget about ’em while you play.

21. Tree-jected? Who cares?

Your rounds will get tougher if your disc deflects off a tree. But you will absolutely trash your score if you let it get to you. This happened to me one day at my local course. I hit a tree on the drive of my first 6 holes. I was so mad that I played 6 holes and quit. If you’re playing competitively, and you happen to hit a tree, just let it go. Who cares that you hit a tree? You’re still going to win, right?

Disc stuck in a tree? Check out our post, “What if My Disc Golf Disc Gets Stuck in a Tree?”

22. Competition is good

Having trouble improving your game? Try adding in a little bit of competition to your game. Instead of just playing for fun, tell your buddies that you’re looking for some competition. I’ll bet that someone (or maybe all your friends) will step up to put forth the challenge for you.

23. Shoot for eagles

Another great way to try and get more birdies is to shoot for eagles on par 4 and par 5 holes. I know that this may be tough, with some holes requiring monster drives or hundreds of trees in the way. But you should still try to get as close as possible. Take those par 4s and par 5s, and in your mind, change them to par 3s and par 4s. Then try to birdie those. If you can do that, you will absolutely crush the competition and double or triple the amount of birdies you usually get.

24. Watch the weather

Before you go out, check the weather conditions so that you can prepare for play. If you fail to recognize windy conditions, snow, or the scorching heat, this could cause you to become distracted at your lack of preparation and your score will show it.

Check out the following resources for playing in the different weather conditions:

“How to Play Disc Golf in the Heat”

“How to Play Disc Golf in the Winter”

“How to Play Disc Golf in the Rain”

“Mastering Disc Golf in the Wind: A Beginner’s Guide”

25. Watch the ground conditions

Ground conditions can also just annihilate your score. Even if it’s sunny and 70° degrees, the ground might be muddy and wet. Adjust accordingly.

26. Use a birdie bag and a towel to keep hands/discs dry

In poor ground conditions, make sure that you prep your birdie bag and some towels to help keep your hands and your discs dry.

You can grab yourself a birdie bag here (link to InfiniteDiscs.com). And I would just grab a cheap pack of towels like these off of Amazon.

27. Use friction disc golf gloves in wet weather

I’m in the process of writing a pretty detailed review post on Friction disc golf gloves because I’ve really enjoyed playing with them so far. That post is coming soon. But they are absolutely great to play with in any kind of wet weather. Playing with these in general, though, can help you improve your game.

Grab your Friction disc golf glove here on InfiniteDiscs.com.

28. Hydrate a lot

Out on the course, whether it’s cold or hot, you need to hydrate your body. I always talk a lot about hydration when it comes to disc golf. And there’s a purpose for it all – dehydration can cause a lot of problems for you including overheating, heat stroke, muscle cramps, mental fatigue, and a lack of muscle recovery after your rounds. Check out familydoctor.org’s post, “Hydration for Athlete’s,” for a thorough explanation of why you need water in sports.

If you want more birdies on the course, you need to thoroughly hydrate yourself.

29. Don’t always focus on birdies – just try to do well.

Instead of stressing about birdies, just make sure that you’re doing what you can to do well and help yourself improve. Birdies are fantastic when you can get them and it will feel even better when you know that you did your best.

30. Don’t sacrifice your par

I know you’re reading this post to find out how you can get more birdies and improve your game. But I want you to understand a simple concept that I’ve talked about multiple times on this site already: don’t sacrifice your par. You might want to be the hero and hit a 100 foot jump put over the river and through the woods. But 99% percent of the time you won’t. And you may not have thought about how far that disc will actually roll when it misses. Yep, you might have left yourself in a worse position than before.

If you ask any of the pros, they will tell you the same thing. And if you watch them play (#37 and #38 in this post), you will notice that they take a lay-up approach to most really tough approach shots that could’ve been putts. The pros will tell you – don’t sacrifice your par. A par is way better than a double bogey.

General improvement

31. Practice how you play

There are a couple of quotes that I live by when it comes to practice. People think the quote, “practice makes perfect,” applies to your training. Wrong. No matter how much practice and work you put in, you can never be perfect. And if you have bad habits, practice can only hurt you. The quotes I live by are: “practice makes permanent” and “practice how you play.” Both of those represent a seriousness in wanting to do better and be better. You definitely still want to have fun with disc golf, but if you want to get better, you have to take your practicing more seriously.

32. You have to buy training equipment

Oh, yes. If you want to get better at disc golf, you 100% percent need to buy training equipment. I just wrote an awesome post called, “The #1 Way to Improve Your Disc Golf Game This Year.” Check that out first.

But training equipment is essential because it allows you to practice your game at home whenever you want.

For you to improve your game, you need 3 essential home practice items:

Portable disc golf basket

At-home practice net

Pro-pull resistance band training system

33. Your technique needs to be flawless

You’ll see that, throughout the majority of posts on this site, I harp a lot on technique. Why? Well, because I saw such a huge improvement in my game when I actually started listening and using proper technique. My ability to get birdies became so much easier.

For our all-inclusive guide on proper technique, check out our post, “7 Steps to the Best Disc Golf Technique and a Perfect Throw.”

34. Expertly learn forehand/backhand/tomahawk

This tip is something I need to work on myself. I’d say I’m pretty decent with my backhand and my tomahawk, but my forehand is definitely lacking. Also, remember when I talked about leaving ourselves shot options earlier? I wasn’t just talking about disc placement. I also meant leaving yourself the option of different angles and different throwing styles.

I want you to get good at every kind of throwing style, too, including the infamous tomahawk throw. I use this quite often, especially because I don’t trust my forehand enough yet. Being good at all three of these throwing styles can not just give you options, but can seriously help you lower your score on the course (yes, that means more birdies).

We already talked quite a bit about backhand technique in the last section, so for that just refer back to our post, “7 Steps to the Best Technique and a Perfect Throw.”

Check out TheHyze’s video on forehand technique here. I liked his video because he broke down the forehand into just a couple of easy steps.

If you want to learn the tomahawk (hammer or thumber) throw, check out Eric Oakley’s quick video here.

35. Analyze yourself

A really easy way to start improving is to analyze your game for a few minutes. Think back to the last few rounds and ask yourself about how it all went. Did you putt poorly? Were your drives straight and getting good distance? Did you approach each basket exactly how you wanted to? Did you throw that new disc well? Think back to all the negatives and try to focus on how you will practice in those areas to make your overall game better.

36. Record yourself…then ask the #discgolfcommunity

A great way to get absolutely roasted is to record yourself and then post it for feedback on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit. Allowing others to take a look at how you’re throwing can be an easy way to find out what you’re doing wrong. Try this one out if you haven’t already.

37. Watch the pros at a real tournament – watch how they play and get birdies

Going to a professional tournament is probably one of the best ways to get hype about your game again. The electricity that you will experience at a professional tournament is unlike anything you’ve ever experienced before with disc golf. If you’ve been to a tournament, you understand what I mean. But if you really want to improve your own game, watching how the best golfers play is a really great way to do that. You will notice the strategy, the focus, and the intense dedication that the elite players use to dazzle the crowds. Just sit back, watch, and learn.

Head here to DGPT.com to check out the current Pro Tour schedule.

38. Watch the pros on YouTube

Another great way to pick up on even more pro tricks is to hop on YouTube and continue following the pros. YouTube features almost all pro disc golf tournaments, including those filmed by JomezPro, Central Coast Disc Golf, and SpinTV. Check them all out through each respective link below.

JomezPro

Central Coast Disc Golf

The SpinTV

39. New courses

Finding new courses to play on is a great way to practice and get better. New courses offer a challenge, new interesting shots, and make you think and strategize in new ways.

A quick Google of, “disc golf courses near me,” can easily show you all of the courses in your general area. You can also check out:

Discgolfcoursereview.com

The PDGA course directory map

Discgolfscene.com

40. Practice in bad weather

Now I’m not saying go out in a Thunderstorm and practice. Nor am I saying go out in a hurricane, tornado, or blizzard. But you should practice your game in a little bit of bad weather like rain, high wind, light snow, and cold weather. I suggest this because all tournaments can’t be 70° degrees and sunny. Some might be cold, wet, windy, or hot. This will help prepare you for the worst.

41. Go get a good pair of shoes

As just a general improvement tip, grab yourself a good pair of slip-proof, all-terrain shoes that will 100% percent help you out on the course and can help you out playing in that bad weather we just talked about. Here are a couple of great choices for you:

Merrell Moab hiking shoes – big fan of Merrell, which is what I use out on the course. Merrell is pretty popular in the #discgolfcommunity.

Merrell All-out Blaze hiking shoe – these look cool as hell. I might pick me up some of these.

Adidas Terrex AX2R disc golf shoe – pretty solid choice for the course.

Latitude 64 Chain Wear T-link disc golf shoe – slowly gaining more traction in the #discgolfcommunity.

42. Don’t give up on the game – go unconventional

If you end up not being able to improve like you want to, don’t just give up on disc golf. A lot of people stop playing because they expect to be great, but don’t quite reach that advanced level. If that happens, start trying new things and ways of practice. Along with the previous 41 tips, hop online and try out everything you possibly can to get better. Even if something seems weird, try it out.

Check out our post, “The 50 Best Disc Golf Drills to Change Your Game Forever.” I made that post as a means to completely shock your skill level with as many great drills as possible. That one thing (well, 50, really) can unconventionally help you get better.

43. Message a pro

Here’s an interesting thing to try: hop on Instagram and Twitter and hit up your favorite players. Why not try to get in contact with them and ask them a few simple questions? This could be a good way to find out a good tip or trick that they use to get better. Think of a clever way to get their attention in a message and ask them for their best disc golf advice. I know this may sound a little off the wall, but it could work.

44. Learn from a mentor

Another fantastic way to continue improving your game is by learning the game from a pro or other really good disc golf mentor. You can learn a lot on your own. And you can practice until you burn out, but you will learn so much more if you can get someone to mentor you in disc golf. Mentors can show you fundamentals, technique, tips and tricks, and things only experienced players know. If you really want to permanently increase your birdie count, find someone who will mentor you.

45. Don’t reject criticism

This next tip is somewhat different than the last, but can apply similarly. I explained how a mentor can help you on the course, but understanding how to accept criticism of your game can also teach you how to best improve and in what areas. You may not be playing with your mentor, but anyone better than you can give you good feedback and advice. I’ve got a couple of friends that I play with regularly who let me know things I can do differently to get better. I want those birdies, so I graciously accept any advice I get from those who are better than me.

Some people, though, don’t like to be critiqued. I’ve met a few on the course that just don’t like when others tell them they’re doing something wrong. That’s how you stay average. If you can learn how to accept the feedback on what you’re doing wrong, your score will inevitably increase over time.

46. It’s okay to be a little dumb – make sure you ask questions

So through all that mentorship and learning and experience with better players, here’s a thought: don’t be afraid to ask questions. This is one thing that really held me down with my game in the beginning months while I was learning. I always saw better players and they would show me how to play better, but I never asked about things that I didn’t understand. Up until just recently (like 2018 recently), I didn’t completely understand stability and flight ratings completely. Once I started asking questions in forums, talking to disc golf buddies, and eventually writing posts about those subjects, I really learned and progressed in my knowledge of the game.

You can check out, “The Complete Disc Golf Stability Guide,” here on the site.

You can also check out our flight ratings guide here: “What Do the Numbers on a Disc Golf Disc Mean?”

47. Popular disc golf books

Before you wrap everything up, check out a couple of these popular titles to help you improve your disc golf game.

The Disc Golf Player’s Manual – you can grab that book written by me here on the site. Check the sidebar ➡️➡️

Zen and the Art of Disc Golf – a great book to help you understand how to be the best disc golf version of yourself that you possibly can be.

The Definitive Guide to Disc Golf – this book is a thoughtful how-to Guide for beginners.

48. 101 tips list

If you really want to improve your game and get more birdies on the course, we’ve got a really great tips list for you to check out here called, “101 Disc Golf Tips to Take Your Game to the Next Level.” That list will surely help you on the course.

Finally…
49. Have fun

Fun is why almost all of started to play this game. And you may have different aspirations for the game now. You once just wanted to get better, but now you may be trying to take a serious run at becoming a pro disc golfer. Whatever your goals for the sport, think about whether or not you still have fun with everything. That’s how the game should be played. Make sure you’re having fun so that you don’t burn out and continue to love disc golf.

50. Remember: your score and improvement are what matter

At the end of the day, I know you want to do well. And I want you to do well. But remember that as long as your score is good and you’ve improved, be happy. You don’t become an expert overnight or even over a few rounds. You will continue to get better and you will continue to get more and more birdies. So just keep at it.

Overall

So there you have it. 50 of the best tips to help you get more birdies and improve your game. Hopefully this was helpful for you. We’d love for you to share this post or tell a couple people about it. If we grow, we can provide a lot more fantastic content for you and the rest of the #discgolfcommunity. Anyway, thanks for reading, disc golfers!

Great job!

If you’ve gotten this far, you must really want to learn more about disc golf. If you’re interested in more frequently asked questions, you can check out the resources below or hit up our FAQ page here.

What is a Birdie in Disc Golf?

How Much Does it (Actually) Cost to Play Disc Golf?

How Many Discs Do You Need to Play Disc Golf?

What if My Disc Golf Disc Goes Out of Bounds?

What if My Disc Golf Disc Lands on Top of the Basket?

More Related Content

You can also check out more of our awesome related content below.

The #1 Way to Improve Your Disc Golf Game This Year

9 Weird Tricks to Improve Your Disc Golf Game (Forever)

101 Disc Golf Tips to Take Your Game to the Next Level

The 12 Best Disc Golf Putting Tips for Beginners

Don’t forget

You can also grab a copy of our book, “The Disc Golf Player’s Manual,” here on the site. It’s packed full of extremely practical tips and tricks to help you immediately start improving on the course!

Red

I am an avid disc golfer and lover of the sport. My mission with DiscgolfNOW.com is to reach as many people as possible to help them love disc golf, too!

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